‘Gut Bacteria Can Cause Alzheimer’s Disease,’ Reveals IIT-Indore Study

‘Gut Bacteria Can Cause Alzheimer’s Disease,’ Reveals IIT-Indore Study

The group investigated a molecular insight into the neuropathology associated with Alzheimer’s disease and Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) mediated neuroinflammation caused by H pylori secretome.

Staff ReporterUpdated: Monday, January 15, 2024, 02:01 PM IST
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The Research Team |

Indore (Madhya Pradesh): The Indian Institute of Technology Indore, in association with Choithram Hospital and Research Center Indore, has investigated the possible role of the most prevalent gut bacteria, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), in gut-brain axis disruption and neuroinflammation, thus shedding a new light on the correlation of this bacterial infection with brain disorders.

“It is possible that gut microbial secretions might enter the brain through one of the longest nerves, connecting the gut to the brain, further inducing neurorelated diseases, and changing the gut-brain axis. The gut-brain axis (GBA) consists of bidirectional communication between the central and enteric nervous systems, linking emotional and cognitive centres of the brain with peripheral intestinal functions,” the study published in the journal “Virulence” says.

The study was conducted by a group of researchers led by Dr. Hem Chandra Jha, associate professor in the Department of Biosciences and Biomedical Engineering at IIT Indore, and Dr. Ajay Kumar Jain from Choithram Hospital and Research Centre.

'H. pylori infection alters the activity of STAT3'

The group investigated a molecular insight into the neuropathology associated with Alzheimer’s disease and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)-mediated neuroinflammation caused by the H. pylori secretome.

STAT3 is a transcription factor that, in humans, is encoded by the STAT3 gene. As per the study, it was found that H. pylori infection increases inflammation in the gut compartment and alters the activity of STAT3 and its downstream molecules. “This might act as a transcriptional regulator for inflammatory and Alzheimer’s disease-associated hallmarks, thus activating molecular signatures associated with Alzheimer's disease-related neurodegeneration,” the study says.

Dr. Hem Chandra Jha said, “Our team assessed the effect of antimicrobial-resistant (AMR) H. pylori strains on brain physiology. We now have a potential mechanism linking stomach bacteria to neurological conditions. This study can help to upgrade the treatment regimen of patients with neurological complications along with prior H. pylori infection. Inhibiting STAT3 emerges as a potential strategy to safeguard against neuroinflammation and the pathological conditions linked to Alzheimer's disease.”

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