Agrylle Review: More Psychological Than Espionage Drama

Agrylle Review: More Psychological Than Espionage Drama

This film, bracing between a spoof and a satire, is more of a psychological drama with a dollop of romance than an espionage film

Troy RibeiroUpdated: Friday, February 02, 2024, 05:14 PM IST
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Agrylle Review: More Psychological Than Espionage Drama |

Title: Agrylle

Director: Matthew Vaughn

Cast: Bryce Dallas, Sam Rockwell, Henry Cavill, John Cena, Dua Lipa, Bryan Cranston, Sofia Boutella, Ariana DeBose, Catherine O’Hara, Samuel L Jackson

Where: In theatres

Rating: ***1/2

This film, bracing between a spoof and a satire, is more of a psychological drama with a dollop of romance than an espionage film.

The film, structured interestingly, begins with Elly Conway (Bryce Dallas), the author of the bestselling eponymous espionage novels interacting with her fans at the release event of her fifth book of the series. She is praised for the realism in her writing style, and fans wonder how she gets the details of her book so exact.

One of the fans even asks her, “Are you a spy too?” 

Elly swears that her writing results from lots of research and nothing else.

Soon, we learn that she is an introvert, “born and raised in New York, and that she wrote her first novel about the secret agent Argylle and a global spy syndicate while working the night shift as a waitress.” 

Argylle, the character from the novel, is essayed by Henry Cavill, who sports a spiked hair-do.

One day, on a train journey, when she is on the way to meet her mother, Ruth (Catherine O’Hara), she is stopped by Aidan (Sam Rockwell), a bearded man who claims to be her fan. He instructs her to follow him. She refuses initially, but when they are chased by a group of gun-toting baddies, she finds herself caught up in the same kind of espionage drama she is used to only writing about. 

Of course, there is more to Elly than meets the eye, to Aidan, and to everyone else we meet in the story, including Elly’s parents, Ritter (Bryan Cranston), and Alfred Solomon (Samuel L. Jackson), an asset tucked away in the French countryside.

The narrative, convoluted with plenty of unpredictable twists and turns, is slow in the first half but picks up momentum during the second-half of the film. This said, is the film entertaining and engaging? It is, provided the way you look at it.

It is fun watching how the story unravels and the talented actors essay their part effortlessly.  Also, ample humour, strewn in the narrative, is mostly good but at times goofy.

A number of visual gags and quirky jokes can be referenced to old spy films. The stunts, chases, and close calls, mostly mounted with computer-generated effects, appear oft-seen.

Among the action sequences, the parachute jump - off the train evokes a nail-biting moment, but one can’t relish this great moment as the scene flits by.

The choreography of the fight sequence with Elly skating on crude oil is worth your ticket price.

Over all the film is a decent entertainer.

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