Bhopal: Visually impaired poets' meet at Tribal Museum

Lack of sight doesn't matter much if you have imagination, feelings, said the artists.

SmitaUpdated: Wednesday, February 16, 2022, 12:35 AM IST
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BHOPAL (Madhya Pradesh): If one has imagination, thoughts and feelings, lack of sight doesn't matter much, said visually impaired poets. The four blind-by-birth poets shared with Free Press how they write poetry despite their impairment.

They recited their works at an event, Hara Wahi Jo Lada Nahi, at the Tribal Museum in the city on Tuesday.

Radhe Shyam Panwaria from Raisen, who teaches at MLB College, Bhopal, said, "Every creation is challenging but it is more challenging for us than for those who are sighted. Similes and metaphors used to describe things help us imagine what they look like. We cannot see a beautiful woman but we can always imagine her beauty by her voice, the way she speaks."

He says that their lack of sight does hamper their imagination but they can feel just as anyone else can. Panwaria has been a college teacher since 2005. "My poems are about love and valour," he said.

Manish Chaudhary is an assistant professor of political science at a government college in Jhabua. He said that writing poetry for a person like him was tough, "but not that much". He has been penning verses since he was a college student. Satire is his favourite genre.

Priyesh Gupta, who works for the forest department in Bhopal, said though he has never seen trees, mountains and rivers, he can imagine how they must be looking by the words used to describe them. "For example, if someone says that clouds look like cotton. Now, I can always feel cotton and that helps me comprehend what clouds must be looking like," he told Free Press

"It sometimes happens that emotions arise in my heart and I feel like putting them on paper but I can't find anyone to do that," he said. Priyesh began writing poetry in 2017-18. "I greeted my acquaintances on their birthdays with verses about them. I was told that I write well and that I should write more. That is how it began," he added. His poems are about love for India and social absurdities.

Rishi Raj, 27, is an employee of education department. "If you have imagination, thoughts and feelings, lack of sight doesn't matter that much," he said.

Divyangs' event

Literature and art can help bridge chasm between the normal people and the Divyangs. This was the objective behind the event, Hara wahi jo lada nahin, organised by MP Sahitya Akademi at Tribal Museum on Tuesday. Divyang Lalit Kumar, who has built the biggest online library of prose and verse and Abhay Kumar Sharma, a stand-up comedian and mimicry artist, joined the event.

A kavi sammelan of visually challenged poets was organised. Lalit Kumarís mimicry regaled the audience. Manish Chaudhary, Rishi Raj, Radheshyam Panwari and Priyesh Kumar recited poems. Academy director Vikas Dube said that this was a unique programme in which all performers were Divyangs.

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