'The Future Of Carnatic Music Is In Safe Hands,' Says Parvathy Ramani, Carnatic Music Teacher

'The Future Of Carnatic Music Is In Safe Hands,' Says Parvathy Ramani, Carnatic Music Teacher

One of the prominent teachers is Parvathy Ramani (67), who has been teaching Carnatic music to two generations of students.

S BalakrishnanUpdated: Monday, April 29, 2024, 09:09 AM IST
article-image
Parvathy Ramani, Carnatic Music Teacher |

If the tradition of Carnatic music is continuing it is because of the countless number of music teachers who are introducing the young generation to the rich treasure. One of the prominent teachers is Parvathy Ramani (67), who has been teaching Carnatic music to two generations of students. Popularly called Bhanu teacher, she not only teaches music, but also explains the meaning of the compositions of Saint Thyagaraja, Muthuswami Dikshitar, etc, so that her students are able to sing with feeling. Ramani spoke to S Balakrishnan recently. Excerpts:

What is the status of Carnatic music in Mumbai? Is it thriving or dying?

Carnatic music is definitely not dying in Mumbai. In fact, more and more students are coming forward to learn it. This is a welcome sign. Even though the younger generation is exposed to other forms of music, Carnatic music still attracts it because that is its innate beauty. Singing Carnatic music is a spiritual experience. The future of Carnatic music is safe in the hands of young musicians, not only in Mumbai but all over India.

Are music sabhas like the Shanmukhananda Sabha, Fine Arts Society and other institutions doing enough to promote and preserve Carnatic music?

Definitely. They have active music schools where a large number of students are learning both Carnatic vocal and instrumental music. In fact, music lovers are grateful to these well-established institutions for promoting not only local talent, but also from outside Mumbai. By inviting top-notch singers from Chennai and other places to perform in Mumbai, these sabhas not only give these artistes a platform in the metropolis, but also expose students in Mumbai to the best that is there in Carnatic music. The role of these institutions can never be underestimated.

Is the advent of social media a good thing as far as Carnatic music is concerned?

We are coming to know about many new artistes as well as new compositions through social media, which is very good. Sitting in the comfort of your home you can listen to the concerts of not only new artistes but also of legends like Chembai Vaidyanatha Bhagavathar, MD Ramanathan and other veterans. Social media is a boon as far as Carnatic music is concerned.

Many of the compositions in Carnatic music are in Telugu. People sing these compositions without knowing the meaning. What is your take on this?

These days we get many books that give meanings of the compositions. The meanings are also available online. Knowing the meaning and singing definitely brings out the emotions embedded in a song better. In fact, I make it a point to teach the meanings to my students to the extent possible.

RECENT STORIES

IN PICS: This Summer, Plan A Trip To Sikkim's Pelling

IN PICS: This Summer, Plan A Trip To Sikkim's Pelling

Cannes 2024: Assam-Based Fashion Designer Sanjukta Dutta To Present Her Collection At The French...

Cannes 2024: Assam-Based Fashion Designer Sanjukta Dutta To Present Her Collection At The French...

Jacqueline Fernandez's Red Carpet Looks Are Not Worth Cannes Fashion - Here's Why We Feel So

Jacqueline Fernandez's Red Carpet Looks Are Not Worth Cannes Fashion - Here's Why We Feel So

Nancy Tyagi Makes Heads Turn With Her Third Outfit At Cannes 2024

Nancy Tyagi Makes Heads Turn With Her Third Outfit At Cannes 2024

World Turtle Day 2024: High Time We Save These Endangered Species

World Turtle Day 2024: High Time We Save These Endangered Species