Music Album Review: Akela By Ankur Tewari Leaves A Listener With A Desire For More Cohesive Innovation

Music Album Review: Akela By Ankur Tewari Leaves A Listener With A Desire For More Cohesive Innovation

The album’s sonics traverse a spectrum that shifts between sombre and hopeful, creating a juxtaposition that mirrors the emotional journey Ankur underwent

Kasmin FernandesUpdated: Friday, August 25, 2023, 04:24 PM IST
article-image

In a world marked by chaos and seclusion, singer-songwriter Ankur Tewari has presented us with his latest album, Akela. Inspired by the tumultuous times of the pandemic, it promises a poetic journey through the emotions that gripped the singer as he navigated the waves of solitude. While his musical intentions are evident, Akela ultimately ends up being a soothing but somewhat unremarkable endeavour.

Ankur’s artistic approach has always been to draw inspiration from life’s varied facets. As he confronts the solitude brought forth by the pandemic, he sets out to encapsulate these sentiments within his music. The album’s soundscape seems like a sonic diary, documenting the artiste’s emotional ebbs and flows during the initial year of the crisis. However, despite his sincere intentions, Akela does not quite manage to transcend the label of an ordinary reflection.

The album’s sonics traverse a spectrum that shifts between sombre and hopeful, creating a juxtaposition that mirrors the emotional journey Ankur underwent. The incorporation of elements such as the Hawaiian steel guitar in Doobay, dreamy falsetto vocals in Parwaana, and even field recordings of birdsong in Hum lends an eclectic touch to the musical palette. Ankur’s desire to immerse the listener in an ambient atmosphere – an experience akin to cosmic drift – is evident, but its execution often wavers between being captivating and merely satisfactory.

Ankur has embarked on a sound that deviates from his previous works. Produced by Rohan Ramanna of Salvage Audio Collective, the album takes on a melancholic and ambient tone. This transition to a new soundscape is admirable, showcasing the singer’s willingness to experiment and evolve. However, the result is a mixed bag. 

Songs like Ik Dooje Ke Liye and Gunjaayish Hai have the same melancholy and yearning for love we’ve heard from countless solo singer-songwriters before. While the departure from the familiar is noteworthy, the execution at times feels uncertain, leaving you as a listener with a desire for more cohesive innovation.

The core of Akela resides in its personal and introspective themes. Ankur acknowledges that the circumstances of the pandemic forced him to confront aspects of his personality that he had concealed before. This record, then, becomes a medium for him to share his private journey with the world. However, while the singer’s vulnerability is palpable, the lyrical and musical content often fails to leave a lasting impression.

In an industry flourishing with diverse expressions of music, Akela strives to carve its own niche. Ankur Tewari’s dedication to his craft and his intention to encapsulate the essence of solitude are commendable. Yet, as an overall experience, this studio record lands somewhere in the middle of the musical spectrum. While its soothing qualities provide a momentary escape, the album falls short of leaving an impact. 

Rating: 2.5 stars 

RECENT STORIES

Buddha Purnima 2024: Inspirational Quotes By Buddha

Buddha Purnima 2024: Inspirational Quotes By Buddha

Brain-Eating Amoeba Kills 5-Year-Old In Kerala: All You Need To Know About This Organism

Brain-Eating Amoeba Kills 5-Year-Old In Kerala: All You Need To Know About This Organism

Cannes 2024 Day 8: Urvashi Rautela, Shahana Goswami Dazzle On Red Carpet

Cannes 2024 Day 8: Urvashi Rautela, Shahana Goswami Dazzle On Red Carpet

Buddha Purnima 2024: Know Significance, Date, Time, And Wishes

Buddha Purnima 2024: Know Significance, Date, Time, And Wishes

Urvashi Rautela Serves Another Dramatic Look At Cannes: How Much Pink Is Too Much Pink?

Urvashi Rautela Serves Another Dramatic Look At Cannes: How Much Pink Is Too Much Pink?