How much does raising a child impact your career?

The new study also reveals important differences in how men and women perceive the impact of having a child on job security and workplace success.

IANSUpdated: Tuesday, February 15, 2022, 08:38 PM IST
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New Delhi: When it comes to raising children, men and women have different perspectives on the division of household labour-from cooking meals to offering emotional support-reveals a new poll from the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago.

The new study also reveals important differences in how men and women perceive the impact of having a child on job security and workplace success. Mothers are more likely to say they perform more of the household responsibilities, while fathers are more likely to say they share the responsibilities equally with their partners.

Yana Gallen, Asst. Prof. says, "In fact, 35 per cent of mothers reported doing more than their partner for each of the eight household responsibilities asked about on the survey, compared to just 3 per cent of fathers who reported the same."

"Although the gap between what mothers and fathers report is significant, it is not what either anticipates before they have children-and that's what is so interesting," said Yana at the Harris School of Public Policy who studies the gender pay gap. "Prior to becoming parents, most men and women expect that they will share the division of labour equally across all household activities, but their views on whether that is actually the case diverge after they have a child."

The perceived impacts of having a child are also relevant to the workplace, where half of the adults who have been employed say having a child is an obstacle to employee advancement, and about 4 in 10 say the same regarding job security and the opportunity for a raise.

Americans' perspectives on children in the workplace are tied to gender as well, with 47 per cent of women saying that having a child is an obstacle for job security compared to 36 per cent of men. Similarly, adults making less than $50,000 a year are more likely than higher-income adults to say having a child is an obstacle for job security (50 per cent vs 35 per cent) and job advancement (55 per cent vs 46 per cent).

Among the key findings from the report: Forty-three per cent of adults without a college degree say having a child is an obstacle to getting a raise, while 32 per cent of adults with a college degree say the same.

Parents are more likely than non-parents to have chosen a job with a schedule such that they can manage their personal responsibilities, spent less time at their job to focus on friends or family, and to have made sure they had the support of friends or family.

Women are more likely than men to have chosen a job with a schedule such that they can manage their personal responsibilities (70 per cent vs 61 per cent) and made sure they had the support of friends or family (73 per cent vs 64 per cent).

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