5 Gin Myths That You Should Be Aware About

5 Gin Myths That You Should Be Aware About

Explore the world of the spirit to bust the preconceived notions

Charnelle MartinsUpdated: Friday, February 02, 2024, 10:04 PM IST
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Pics: Freepik

There are a lot of myths and assumptions around gin, especially given the fact that the gin revolution in India is new and many consumers are still exploring and learning more about the spirit. Explore the world of gin to bust the preconceived notions around gin.

Garnishing

The first one is that gin should only be garnished with citrus fruits like lemon or lime. While citrus fruits pair well with most gins and are undoubtedly easy, quick garnishes for your G&T, there are loads of other options in your kitchen cabinet waiting to be explored. Garnishes can either compliment the gin used – an ingredient that is part of the gin’s existing botanical mix or can be an ingredient that adds subtle nuances to the spirit to uplift your sensorial drinking experience.

Taste

The next common myth is that gin tastes just like Juniper! Juniper is a necessary addition for a spirit to be considered a gin. But it does not have to be the focus of the product. In any gin, the botanicals used vary as there are over a hundred possible combinations. No two gins are alike, making each spirit very diverse and exciting in flavour.

Styles

Pic: Reddit

Another often-heard myth around gin is that all gins are of a particular style and made the same way! There are over six styles of gin, each made uniquely. These styles include Dutch Gin, London Dry, Cold Compound, Plymouth and Old Tom.

Health origins

The myth every gin lover is guilty of is that gin and tonic cures malaria. We know the history of the original tonic water being used to cure malaria. So, we assume consuming a few G&Ts is going to still be the solution today. However, what most don’t know is that the tonic water we love so much has changed its recipe over time to reduce the actual quinine content (the active ingredient that cures malaria) and increase the sugar content to make it a more palatable mixer. If we were still having tonic water in its original form, we wouldn’t like it as much since it would be too bitter to have after a few sips.

Flavoured gin

Next up, something we get to hear a lot is that “flavoured gin is a new category”. It may seem like a new trend for many gin brands to have a “flavoured” version with various fruits, herbs and spices. Often, you would notice this with the colour of the gin. For example, pink gin is a new category with red fruits, berries, citrus and flowers or the deep magenta-hued These types of gins have existed since 1687, when gin was being commercially made in England and became a popular style in the late 1800s as brands began making different flavoured editions. It is a fun way to showcase creativity and play with new flavours that complement the perfect balance of each gin.

(Charnelle Martins is the Head Distillerat Stranger & Sons – Third Eye Distillery.)

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