What is Postmenopausal Osteoporosis? Know about your bone health

Is ageing affecting your bones and making them weaker?

FPJ Web DeskUpdated: Wednesday, November 02, 2022, 04:51 PM IST
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Representative image | file

Did you know? Osteoporosis is a common occurrence in postmenopausal women. It is a condition that weakens bones and increases the risk of fractures. It refers to a decrease in bone mass and strength. Study suggests that women are prone of this bone condition during menopause, and as a result of ageing.

Experts suggest that Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a consequence of oestrogen deficiency, and is the most common type of osteoporosis observed in elder females. 

Diagnosis

(CT) scan or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure how or if osteoporosis has impacted the spine. The reports also assist the physician to diagnose how deeply the bones have been affected.

Treatment options

Despite the disclaimer that it is always better to personally visit a health care expert if an individual is suffering of any ailment, here are a few recommended methods to treat the postmenopausal condition.

  • Relax, bed rest until cure

  • Oestrogen therapy by intake of hormone pills

  • Consuming calcium and vitamin D supplements

  • NO to smoking and drinking

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