Eid al-Adha: Date, Time, Significance, And All You Need To Know

Eid al-Adha: Date, Time, Significance, And All You Need To Know

As per Islamic faith, Eid al-Adha, also known as Bakrid, is a festival observed with the belief of sacrifice. With its holy meal gathering and prayers, known as Namaz, this celebration honors religious beliefs and provides an opportunity to bond with families and the community.

Manasi KambleUpdated: Saturday, June 15, 2024, 11:01 AM IST
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Eid Al-Adha | FPJ

Eid al-Adha, also known as the "Bakrid," or "Festival of the Sacrifice," is a significant Islamic holiday that falls on the 10th day of Dhu al-Hijjah, the final month of the Islamic lunar calendar. The exact date of Eid al-Adha varies each year because the Islamic calendar is based on lunar cycles, which are slightly shorter than solar years. This guide will delve into the date, significance, history, and traditions associated with Eid al-Adha.

Offering prayer, Namaz

Offering prayer, Namaz | Representative Image

When Is Eid Al-Adha Celebrated?

Since the Islamic calendar follows the moon's cycles, the date of Eid al-Adha changes from year to year. Muslims determine the beginning of each lunar month by sighting the crescent moon. According to the Islamic calendar, Eid al-Adha is observed on the tenth day of the twelfth and last month, Dhu al-Hijja. The three days that follow are referred to as the Tashreeq days, during which festivities are customarily continued.

For Eid al-Adha 2024, the date of celebration falls from June 16 to June 17, which is observed as a public holiday in India. However, the exact date will be confirmed closer to the time based on the sighting of the crescent moon.

Offering meal,

Offering meal, | Representative Image

The Significance of Eid al-Adha: A Test of Faith

Eid al-Adha commemorates a pivotal story in Islam that exemplifies the importance of faith, obedience, and sacrifice. According to Islamic tradition, Prophet Ibrahim (Abraham) received a command from God in a dream, instructing him to sacrifice his most beloved son, Ishmael (Ishmail). This act tested Ibrahim's unwavering devotion and willingness to submit to God's will.

Prophet Ibrahim was prepared to make the ultimate sacrifice and to follow God's command. However, just as he was about to carry it out, God intervened, recognizing and appreciating Ibrahim's unwavering faith. As a reward for his loyalty, God provided a ram to be sacrificed in place of Ishmael.

This story of sacrifice lies at the heart of Eid al-Adha. It emphasizes the importance of submitting to God's will, even when faced with immense difficulty. The willingness to make sacrifices for one's faith and the well-being of others is a core theme of this holiday.

Family gathering

Family gathering | Representative Image

Traditions And Celebrations Of Eid al-Adha

Eid al-Adha is a joyous occasion marked by several traditions and practices:

Eid Prayer: The festivities begin with a special Eid prayer held on the morning of Eid al-Adha. Muslims dress in their finest attire and gather at mosques or designated prayer grounds to offer prayers and listen to a sermon delivered by the Imam.

The Sacrifice: A key tradition of Eid al-Adha is the sacrifice of an animal, typically a sheep, goat, cow, or camel. The sacrificed animal is then divided into three parts: one-third is kept for the family, one-third is shared with relatives and friends, and the remaining one-third is distributed to the poor and needy.

Sharing And Feasts: Eid al-Adha is a time for families and communities to come together. After the Eid prayer and sacrifice, families gather for elaborate meals featuring dishes prepared with the sacrificed meat. It's a time for sharing, laughter, and strengthening bonds with loved ones.

Greetings And Gifts: Muslims exchange greetings of "Eid Mubarak" (Blessed Eid) throughout the day. Children often receive gifts of money or new clothes.

Visiting Loved Ones: Visiting relatives, friends, and especially the elderly or sick is a significant aspect of the celebration. It's a time to mend broken relationships, show compassion, and spread joy.

Greetings

Greetings | Representative Image

Beyond The Sacrifice: Social Responsibility And Charity

An essential aspect of Eid al-Adha is the emphasis on social responsibility and charity. Distributing a portion of the sacrificed meat to the less fortunate ensures that everyone in the community can partake in the festivities. It's a reminder to Muslims to share their blessings with those in need and foster a spirit of compassion and generosity.

The Global Reach Of Eid al-Adha

Eid al-Adha is a globally celebrated holiday observed by followers of Islam all over the world. While traditions may vary slightly depending on the region, the core themes of sacrifice, sharing, and piety remain constant. The celebration transcends geographical boundaries, uniting Muslims in a shared experience of faith, gratitude, and community.

Eid al-Adha is more than just a joyous celebration; it's a profound reminder of faith, sacrifice, and social responsibility. It is a time for people who follow Islam, to reflect on the importance of obedience to God, strengthen family ties, and share blessings with those in need.

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