Bhopal: Master Potters' Creations Dazzle Art Lovers At ‘Potters Market 2023’ In Gauhar Mahal (Pics Inside)

Bhopal: Master Potters' Creations Dazzle Art Lovers At ‘Potters Market 2023’ In Gauhar Mahal (Pics Inside)

Ceramist Subodh Poddar’s ‘Mohenjo-Daro Live’ takes you 5000 years back.

Staff ReporterUpdated: Monday, November 27, 2023, 12:30 PM IST
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Bhopal (Madhya Pradesh): Inspired by Harappan artefacts, ‘Mohenjo-Daro Live’, a series of ceramic and terracotta sculptures crafted by master potter Sobodh Poddar, are mesmerising and evocative at the same time. Poddar’s sculptures depict the ‘Mohenjo-Daro dancer’ in different poses of the Oddissi dance form.   

Art lovers seeing ceramic and terracotta works of Subodh Poddar in ‘Potters Market’ at Gauhar Mahal in the city.

Art lovers seeing ceramic and terracotta works of Subodh Poddar in ‘Potters Market’ at Gauhar Mahal in the city. |

Poddar’s series, along with the works of three other master potters, are on display at  Gauhar Mahal in the city as part of a four-day ‘Potters Market 2023,’ organised by Bhopal Potters Development Welfare Society. 

Poddar learned Odissi from Kelucharan Mahapatra’s disciple Shankar Behra for four years to ensure that the dancers in his sculptures look real. All the dancers in the series have a red thread covering their private parts. “These idols were made 5,000 years back and at the time, artists could show dancers in the nude. No artist can dare make such figures now,” Poddar told the Free Press, adding that, “it is often said that Harappa marked the beginning of civilization. But I believe that Harappa marks the beginning of the end of civilization.” He has given some of his sculptures a golden hue by wrapping them in 24-karat gold foils while gas firing.

Born into a Bengali family in Madhya Pradesh, Poddar studied at Sir J J Institute of Arts, Mumbai. He worked in advertising agencies as illustrator, art director and creative director and produced more than 200 TV commercials, including memorable ones like Nerolac Paints, Santoor Soap and Amul the Taste of India After retirement, he returned to his childhood passion - sculpture. “This is a collection of my ten-year journey in ceramics. I was quite old when I joined this field and so I chose to sculpt images from the forgotten past,” the 68-year-old said.

'Journey ' a series of ceramic  artworks , crafted by  Sandeep Manchekar

'Journey ' a series of ceramic artworks , crafted by Sandeep Manchekar |

Another JJ School of Arts alumnus Sandeep Manchekar from Mumbai has displayed four works under a series titled ‘Journey’. Clay has been his constant companion since his childhood. The universe is round and constantly moving but we humans make everything square to seek stability, he says. And this is what his works depict. Churning new thoughts of glaze from organic, flowy, undulated to definite and structured through reparative firings helped him fashion his artworks. 

Female torso crafted by ceramist Sultana Khan

Female torso crafted by ceramist Sultana Khan |

Another master potter, Sultana Khan’s ceramic works include female torsos. Sultana, who lives in Mumbai, creates figurative sculptures with the goal to engage, inspire and provoke viewers with her work. Working with clay allows for a playful and spontaneous approach, she says.  

Sultana chose clay as her medium to sculpt her life's journey. Representational sculpture is a natural extension of her vision. The shapes and forms of her sculptures are an expression of internal and external influences on her life. She hopes to create contemplative pieces that have a connection to the soul, she said. 

An artlover clicking a picture of ' Perfectly Imperfect,' a series of terracotta artworks, crafted by Omprakash Galav.

An artlover clicking a picture of ' Perfectly Imperfect,' a series of terracotta artworks, crafted by Omprakash Galav. |

Omprakash Galav from Alwar, Rajasthan, is the 15th-generation potter of his family. The collection of his works ‘Perfectly Imperfect’ portray the ups and downs of life.

“When I used to make clay artefacts in my childhood, some of them used to break but the shape they had when they broke attracted me a lot and I felt like making such artefacts,” he says, adding that fashioning such works is quite challenging and painstaking because almost 80% of the pieces break while in the making.   

Besides the exhibition, around 40 potters from across the country have displayed their ceramic and terracotta works in the ‘Potters  Market,’ which will remain open for art lovers till November 26 from 11am-8pm.

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