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Updated on: Monday, November 01, 2021, 11:27 AM IST

Developed nations have enjoyed the fruits of energy, should cut emissions, says Piyush Goyal

Before the UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) set to be staged in Scotland, Piyush Goyal, India's representative in the event said the nation will "represent the voice of the developing world."
Piyush Goyal  | Photo: ANI

Piyush Goyal | Photo: ANI

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New Delhi: India has called upon the developed countries who have "enjoyed the fruits of energy" to attain net zero faster so that developing nations use some "carbon space" to drive growth, according to a report in NDTV.

'Net zero emissions' implies to attaining an overall balance between greenhouse gas emissions produced and greenhouse gas emissions taken out of the atmosphere.

Before the UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties (COP26) set to be staged in Scotland, Piyush Goyal, India's representative in the event said the nation will "represent the voice of the developing world" as it fights with the issues of climate change to ensure a better world for the generations to come.

"Developed nations have enjoyed the fruits of energy and they will need to go for net zero faster, so that developing nations have some carbon space. For now there is no adequate technology to absorb large amount of clean energy into grids. There is a need to look at more technology and innovation before we can identify the year (for achieving net zero)," Mr Goyal said.

"India pushed for safeguarding interests of the developing world. For the first time, G20 has identified sustainable and responsible consumption as critical enablers for achieving climate goals," Mr Goyal said.

The Rome Declaration released after the Summit, below a headline called "Support to vulnerable countries", featured the G20 welcoming recent pledges worth around $45 billion, as a effort for a total global ambition of voluntary contributions of $100 billion for the nations in most need. It implies that developed economies of the G20 will work for a combined $100 billion fund to facilitate developing countries to meet their clean energy targets.

Ahead of Goyal's address, Alok Sharma, the president of the summit in his opening speech said that COP26 climate talks are the "last, best hope" to keep the objective of restricting the global warming to a limit of 1.5 degree Celsius alive.

The Glasgow meeting, which runs to November 12, comes in the backdrop of an increasing onslaught of extreme weather events all over the planet underscoring the adverse effects of climate change from 150 years of burning fossil fuels.

"We know that our shared planet is changing for the worse," said Mr Sharma at the opening ceremony.

Scientists warn that only transformative action over the course of next 10 years will help avert catastrophic impacts. COP26 formed its central goal from the historic 2015 Paris Agreement, which witnessed nations agreeing to cap global warming at "well below" 2 degree Celsius above pre-industrial levels, and 1.5 degree Celsius if possible.

In August a shocking "code red" report from the world's top climate science body warned that our planet's average temperature will reach the 1.5 degree Celsius threshold around 2030, ten years earlier than the projections made only three years ago.

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Published on: Monday, November 01, 2021, 11:27 AM IST
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