Easter 2024: Here Are Some Unique Festive Traditions From Across The World

Easter 2024: Here Are Some Unique Festive Traditions From Across The World

In Finland, children dress up as Easter witches and go door to door, trading decorated willow branches for sweets

Manasi Y MastakarUpdated: Sunday, March 31, 2024, 12:16 AM IST
article-image
(Pic: Facebook)

Finland

(Pic: Tumblr)

In Finland, children dress up as Easter witches and go door to door, trading decorated willow branches for sweets. This tradition, known as "Virpominen," is similar to Halloween trick-or-treating. In some parts of Finland, particularly in rural areas, Easter bonfires are lit on Holy Saturday. These bonfires symbolise the end of winter and the arrival of spring. Traditional Finnish Easter foods include mämmi, a sweet malted rye pudding often served with cream and sugar. Another popular Easter dish is lamb, which is often roasted and served with potatoes and vegetables.

Ethiopia

(Pic: Ena.Et)

Ethiopian Orthodox Christians celebrate Easter, known as Fasika, with a special overnight vigil at churches. It begins late in the evening and continues until the early hours of Easter Sunday morning, with prayers, hymns, and readings from the Bible. After the service, families gather for a festive meal featuring traditional dishes such as "doro wat" (spicy chicken stew), "injera" (sourdough flatbread), and other delicacies. The ancient town of Lalibela is famous for its rock-hewn churches, and Easter is a particularly special time to visit. Pilgrims from across Ethiopia travel to Lalibela to participate in the Easter celebrations, which include special church services, processions, and rituals.

Bermuda

(pic: Pinterest)

In Bermuda, Easter is celebrated with a unique tradition that is distinct to the island. One of the most notable Easter traditions in Bermuda is the flying of kites on Good Friday. This tradition dates back to the 19th century. According to local lore, a teacher named William James Hinson introduced kite flying to the island as a way to teach his students about the ascension of Jesus Christ. He crafted a kite in the shape of a cross and flew it to demonstrate Christ's ascent to heaven. Over time, kite flying on Good Friday became a popular Easter tradition among Bermudians. In addition to casual kite flying, there are often organised competitions and events held on Good Friday. These may include kite-making workshops, kite-flying contests, and kite races. Prizes are awarded for the most creative kites, the highest-flying kites, and other categories.

Poland

Easter in Poland, known as Wielkanoc, is a significant holiday deeply rooted in tradition and religious observance. Palm Sunday marks the beginning of Holy Week. In Poland, it is customary for people to bring elaborately woven palm branches to church to be blessed. These palm branches, often adorned with ribbons and flowers, are then taken home and displayed in houses as a symbol of protection and blessing. Easter Monday, also known as Śmigus-Dyngus, is a day of playful water fights and splashing. It is customary for people, especially young children, to playfully drench each other with water, symbolising purification and renewal.

Greece

(pic: facebook)

In Corfu, Greece, Easter is celebrated with vibrant traditions drawing from the island's culture and Orthodox Christian faith. One of the most notable Easter traditions in Corfu is the custom of the ‘pot smashing’ or ‘Botides’. During Holy Saturday morning, residents of Corfu throw clay pots out of their windows, smashing them in the streets below. This tradition symbolises the casting out of the old year and the welcoming of the new year, as well as the triumph of good over evil. The sound of pots breaking fills the air, creating an exciting and lively atmosphere throughout the town. On Holy Saturday night, locals gather at churches throughout Corfu to attend the Resurrection service, known as Anastasi. At midnight, the priest announces the resurrection of Christ, and the church bells ring joyously while fireworks light up the sky.

Norway

(pic: freepik)

One unique Norwegian Easter tradition is the tradition of reading crime fiction during the Easter holiday. Referred to as Påskekrim, it's a common practice for Norwegians to read detective novels, watch crime dramas on television, or attend mystery-themed events during Easter. This tradition has its roots in the publishing of crime novels around Easter in the early 20th century and has since become a cultural phenomenon. On Palm Sunday, some Norwegian towns and cities hold processions where participants carry palm fronds or decorated branches to commemorate Jesus' entry into Jerusalem. With Easter falling in the spring season, many Norwegians take advantage of the holiday to enjoy outdoor activities such as skiing, hiking, and spending time in nature.

Australia

(pic: wikipedia)

In Australia, Easter is celebrated with a combination of religious observances, cultural traditions, and outdoor activities. Instead of the Easter Bunny, the bilby, a native Australian marsupial, has become a symbol of Easter in Australia. Due to conservation efforts to protect native wildlife, there has been a movement to replace the traditional Easter Bunny with the Easter Bilby. In some cities, such as Sydney, the Royal Easter Show is a popular event featuring agricultural exhibits, animal shows, carnival rides, and entertainment. The show typically runs during the Easter period and attracts visitors from across the country.

Italy

(pic: pixabay)

Italians observe Holy Week (Settimana Santa) with solemn processions, church services, and religious rituals. Throughout the week, there are reenactments of the Passion of Christ and the Stations of the Cross in many towns and cities across Italy. In Florence, during the Easter Sunday morning Mass at the Duomo di Firenze (Florence Cathedral), a historic and ornately decorated cart, known as the Brindellone, is filled with fireworks and set ablaze. This 350-year-old tradition called Scoppio del Carro is a celebration of the resurrection of Jesus Christ and the arrival of spring. The explosion of the cart is believed to bring good luck and a good harvest for the year ahead. In addition to the Scoppio del Carro, other Easter traditions in Florence include religious processions, church services, and feasting with family and friends. Florentines gather to enjoy traditional Easter dishes such as "colomba di Pasqua" (Easter dove cake), "agnello al forno" (roast lamb), and "torta di riso" (rice cake) as they celebrate this important holiday in the heart of Tuscany.

RECENT STORIES

Chitrangada, Dearest Pancham And More... Top Picks Of The Week

Chitrangada, Dearest Pancham And More... Top Picks Of The Week

Chess: Learn The Strategic Ideas For Middlegame

Chess: Learn The Strategic Ideas For Middlegame

Some Tips To Start Your Blogging Journey

Some Tips To Start Your Blogging Journey

Some Common House Plant Problems And How To Avoid Them

Some Common House Plant Problems And How To Avoid Them

7 Drinks To Help You Achieve Radiant Skin

7 Drinks To Help You Achieve Radiant Skin