Washington : A new study has revealed that the use of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) among children and adolescents with chronic migraine result in greater reductions in headache frequency and migraine-related disability compared with headache education, reports ANI.

Scott W. Powers, Ph.D., of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, and colleagues randomized 135 participants (79 percent female) 10 to 17 years of age diagnosed with chronic migraine.
The study was conducted in the Headache Center at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital between October 2006 and September 2012; 129 participants completed 20-week follow-up and 124 completed 12-month follow-up.
The interventions consisted of 10 CBT or 10 headache education sessions involving equivalent time and therapist attention; CBT included training in pain coping, modified to include a biofeedback component.
Each group received amitriptyline; follow-up visits were conducted at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months.
At 12-month follow-up, 86 percent of CBT participants had a 50 percent or greater reduction in days with headache vs. 69 percent of the headache education group; 88 percent of CBT participants had a PedMIDAS of less than 20 points (mild to no disability) vs. 76 percent of the headache education group.

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