New York: Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan addresses the 74th session of the United Nations General Assembly, Friday, Sept. 27, 2019. AP/PTI(AP9_27_2019_000304B)
New York: Pakistan's Prime Minister Imran Khan addresses the 74th session of the United Nations General Assembly, Friday, Sept. 27, 2019. AP/PTI(AP9_27_2019_000304B)

United Nations: Pakistan Prime Minister Imran Khan on Friday again raised the nuclear bogey. When two nuclear armed countries fight it will have "consequences" for the entire world, Khan said, making numerous references to Jammu and Kashmir in his speech at the UN General Assembly.

"It is a test for the UN," he said, speaking shortly after Prime Minister Narendra Modi, who, without mentioning Pakistan, urged the world to unite against terror.

In a long speech, Khan focused mostly ran down India's decision to end special status of Jammu and Kashmir. He also made the bizarre claim that "there are no militant organisations in Pakistan."

Khan argued that "there would be a bloodbath when the curfew in Kashmir is lifted". "Has PM Modi thought what would happen when the curfew in Kashmir is lifted? Do you think people in Kashmir would accept the change in their special status? Thousands of children in Kashmir have been put under detention.

They, too, will come out on the streets after the curfew is lifted. There will be a bloodbath," Khan predicted. "If people come out on the streets, Army will shoot them.

We do hear about pellet guns being used on the people of Kashmir. But after the curfew is lifted in Kashmir, there will be another attack like Pulwama and Pakistan will be blamed," he said in his grim forecast of what lies ahead "If there's a bloodbath, Muslims will become radicals. You are forcing Muslims into radicalisation," Khan argued.

He also reasoned that Islamophobia has grown at an alarming pace after the 9/11 attacks and is creating divisions, with wearing of hijab becoming a "weapon" against the community in some countries.

Khan also questioned the use of the term 'radical Islamic terrorism', saying there is only one Islam. "There is no such thing as radical Islam," he said, pointing out that all religions have individuals carrying out radical acts.

"The basis of all religions is compassion and justice which differentiates us from the animal kingdom," he said. The prime minister told the UN that there should be an understanding for other faiths, but they are seen to be creating divisions among global population.

"What message does this (the term) send? How is a person in New York going to distinguish between moderate Muslims and radical Muslims?" he asked. Khan's remarks came a day after he announced that Pakistan, Turkey and Malaysia have decided to jointly launch an English language Islamic television channel to correct misperceptions and confront the challenges posed by Islamophobia.

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