Joe’s Cabinet picks face GOP disapproval: Biden and Republicans not on the same page
PIC: AFP

President-elect Joe Biden's Cabinet picks are quickly running into the political reality of a narrowly controlled Senate that will leave the new Democratic administration dependent on rival Republicans to get anything done.

Under leader Mitch McConnell, the Republican senators will hold great sway in confirming Biden's nominees regardless of which party holds the majority after runoff elections in January. Biden will have little room to maneuver and few votes to spare.

As Biden rolled out his economic team Tuesday - after introducing his national security team last week - he asked the Senate to give his nominees prompt review, saying they "deserve and expect nothing less." But that seems unlikely. Republicans are swiftly signaling that they're eager to set the terms of debate and exact a price for their votes.

Biden's choice for budget chief, Neera Tanden, was instantly rejected as "radioactive." His secretary of state nominee, Antony Blinken, quickly ran into resistance from GOP senators blasting his record amid their own potential 2024 White House campaigns.

Even as most Republican senators still refuse to publicly acknowledge President Donald Trump's defeat, they are launching new battles for the Biden era.

The GOP is suspended between an outgoing president it needs to keep close - Trump can still make or break careers with a single tweet - and the new one they are unsure how to approach. Almost one month since the Nov. 3 election, McConnell and Biden have not yet spoken.

"The disagreement, disorientation and confusion among Republicans will make them inclined to unite in opposition," said Ramesh Ponnuru, a visiting fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, during a Tuesday briefing.

"They don't necessarily know what they're for, but they can all agree they don't like Neera Tanden." A new president often runs into trouble with at least a few Cabinet or administrative nominees, individuals who rub the Senate the wrong way and fail to win enough votes for confirmation or are forced to withdraw after grueling public hearings.

Trump's nominees faced enormous resistance from Senate Democrats, who used their minority-party status to slow-walk confirmation for even lower-level positions. It's been an escalation of the Senate's procedural battles for at least a decade.

But the battles ahead are particularly sharp as Biden tries to stand up an administration during the COVID-19 crisis and economic freefall, rebuilding a government after Trump chased away many career professionals and appointed often-untested newcomers.

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