Real size figures of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (L) and former Brazilian president (2003-2011) Luiz Inacio Lula Da Silva with the National Congress in the background are seen during a protest against them in Brasilia on April 11, 2016. 
An impeachment committee was due to vote Monday on the fate of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff ahead of a decisive vote in the lower house of Congress on whether she will face trial. / AFP PHOTO / ANDRESSA ANHOLETE
Real size figures of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff (L) and former Brazilian president (2003-2011) Luiz Inacio Lula Da Silva with the National Congress in the background are seen during a protest against them in Brasilia on April 11, 2016. An impeachment committee was due to vote Monday on the fate of Brazilian President Dilma Rousseff ahead of a decisive vote in the lower house of Congress on whether she will face trial. / AFP PHOTO / ANDRESSA ANHOLETE

A congressional committee voted Monday to recommend that the impeachment process against President Dilma Rousseff (pic cap) move forward, bringing the possible ouster of the embattled leader a step closer.

Rousseff is facing impeachment proceedings over allegations her administration violated fiscal rules to mask budget problems.

Her opponents say the process is in line with the wishes of the majority of Brazilians, while Rousseff’s supporters call it a blatant power grab by her foes.

The special congressional commission voted 38-27 to recommend the continuation of the impeachment process — comfortably more than the 33 votes needed to hand the pro-impeachment camp a victory.

The panel’s session stretched out all day and was marked by a prolonged shouting match ahead of the evening vote. Pro-impeachment leaders festooned their desks with signs reading “impeachment now,” while Rousseff’s supporters chanted “Coup, coup, coup”.

The outcome had been widely expected, and it was largely symbolic because no matter the outcome of the vote, the matter would still have gone to the full lower house for a crucial vote expected at week’s end on whether to send the matter to the Senate for a possible trial.

With 342 votes in the 513-member Chamber of Deputies needed for the process to move forward, analysts say the outcome of that vote is too close to call.

If the impeachment measure passes in the Chamber of Deputies, it goes to the Senate, which would decide whether to open a trial. If that happened, Rousseff would be suspended from office for up to 180 days during a trial.

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