R Ashwin (L) and Ricky Ponting
R Ashwin (L) and Ricky Ponting
Agencies

On Sunday, R Ashwin played down the banter with Ricky Ponting over Mankading saying that it was a ‘market strategy’.

Ricky Ponting, the Delhi Capitals coach had said he’d speak to Ashwin with Mankanding batsmen.

Earlier, Ponting had said he will not allow senior India off-spinner Ravichandran Ashwin to employ the controversial "Mankading" dismissal during the upcoming IPL as "it's not within the spirit of the game".

Last IPL, Rajasthan Royals batsman Jos Buttler was run out on 69 while backing up at the non-striker's end, with Ashwin, then captaining Kings XI Punjab, whipping off the bails after the batsman stepped out of the crease before the ball was bowled. Ashwin will play for Delhi Capitals this year.

The dismissal, named after former India spinner Vinoo Mankad who ran out Australia's Bill Brown in similar fashion in 1947, is permitted under cricket's laws but viewed by some as going against the spirit of the game.

"I'll be having a chat with him about (Mankading), that's the first thing I'll do. That is going to be a hard conversation I will have with him. I think, even him, looking back now, probably he'd say it was within the rules and he's right to do it," Ponting said while speaking on 'The Grade Cricketer' Podcast.

However, later they decided that they were on the same page.

Ashwin, who was in the spotlight last IPL after dismissing Jos Buttler during a Kings XI Punjab versus Rajasthan Royals encounter, did something that his current IPL coach didn't endorse.

However, Ashwin and Ponting have had an open discussion here over the mode of dismissal and by the former Australian captain's own admission, they have reached a common ground.

"He (Ashwin) made me get on a podcast with him when I first arrived here to have a good open chat about it," Ponting told 'Cricket.com.au'. "I think we're both on the same page. He feels he did everything in the rules and laws of the game and he's absolutely right," Ponting said.

In fact, Ponting found logic in Ashwin's rationale.

"He's saying, 'What if it's the last ball of the IPL, what if I'm bowling and the batting teams needs two runs to win and the non-striker is charging halfway down the wicket? What do you expect me to do'?

"There's an argument there as well, but as I said to him, I would expect that he would hold on to the ball and not Mankad and tell the batsman to stay in his crease next time and see if he's good enough to try and close the game out for us."

The batting great, however, made it clear that there is no place for "cheating" which is the case when non-strikers tend to back up too far.

"It shouldn't get to that stage anyway, batsmen shouldn't be cheating. That's what batsmen are doing, batsmen are actually cheating by trying to steal a yard or two here or there. It's something that needs to be addressed."

"I think something has to happen with the laws of the game to make sure batsmen can't cheat and there certainly shouldn't be the ........ rule the way it is," he said.

"I think if you bring in some sort of run penalty for the batsman if they're deliberately leaving their crease and pinching ground that might be the way to go about it.

"I'm sure those discussions are happening at the moment because I don't think it's a good look on the game.

(To download our E-paper please click here. The publishers permit sharing of the paper's PDF on WhatsApp and other social media platforms.)

Free Press Journal

www.freepressjournal.in