Build a Momentum

They say that love that flows with spontaneity is the love that has been generated through habit. Loving is a momentum, and you gain momentum by doing something every day and doing it when it’s not  easy, says RUBY LILAOWALA.

Build a Momentum

There will never be a list of do’s and don’ts for how to make yourself love more – no ready made formulas. We each have to discover for ourselves what is the key that unleashes the wellspring of love within us.

Yet one thing the masters of love do tell us is that it becomes easier to love when we make it a habit. They say that love that flows with spontaneity is the love that has been generated through habit. Loving is a momentum, and you gain momentum by doing something every day and doing it when it’s not easy. By priming the pump of the fount of love, your heart will be ready on a moment’s notice to soothe a troubled heart, a tired body or a soul in pain.

When people need love, they need it now. When they are in distress or despair, when they are sick or suicidal, they need an immediate transfer from your heart to their heart. If your baby is crying, you don’t wait until you have finished what you are doing to find out what’s wrong.

The same principle applies whenever you are dedicated to increasing the flow of love through your heart. You are on God’s hotline, and he can call you anytime of the day or night and say, “I have got somebody in need. Go and help that person.” When we love, we don’t say, we don’t say, “I care about you, but it’s just too inconvenient to do this or that now.” Love is measured by actions we take, and it means the most when we are able to give it consistently under extraordinary circumstances.

U Tin U, one of the leaders of the democracy movement in Myanmar, understood this principle. In circumstances that would have caused most people to lash out or become bitter, he resolved to keep his love alive. He had been in prison for three years and had almost served his full term when he was retried and sentenced again – for seven years! He was finally released in 1995.

Speaking of his imprisonment and solitary confinement, he said that even though he was severely restricted, he found ways to keep his spirit alive.” My hut within the prison compound was completely encircled with barbed wire. I was indoors all the time, ” he said. “And the wire was a constant reminder of how precious freedom was. The loss of one’s freedom can inspire reflection on the preciousness of freedom. This filled me with joy.”

“I would also recite the Buddha’s discourses in Pali as well as study them, which inspired me greatly. In addition, a small book containing quotations of Jesus was smuggled through to me. I very much liked his attitude of forgiveness and sincerity.” During his imprisonment, U Tin U’s wife would visit and bring him food. How precious her visits and her gifts must have been. Yet U Tin U went out of his way to share this food with his jailers and even some of the military intelligence personnel. “I wanted to overcome any feelings of seeing them as the ‘enemy’ so I tried to make a practice of sharing a little of my food with them,” he said. “They too had a hard life in prison.”

U Tin U instinctively knew that if we build a momentum of love, our heart will never shut down. If we continually allow a flood tide of love to flow from our hearts to others, the gates of our heart will never close. The masters of love also tell us that if we can keep our hearts open, even when it is painful, we can be an agent of compassion and positive change on earth.

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