Advertisement

Indore

Updated on: Monday, September 13, 2021, 10:36 PM IST

Indore: Merely 23.5% seats filled in city's MEd colleges after two rounds of counselling, final round left

Out of 350 seats in six MEd colleges in the city, merely 82 got filled in two rounds of centralised online admission counselling conducted by Department of Higher Education (DAVV).
College admissions  | FPJ

College admissions | FPJ

Advertisement

Indore

The popularity of Master of Education (MEd) course is on the wane. Fewer students are opting for this two-year teacher education course which once was high in demand.

Out of 350 seats in six MEd colleges in the city, merely 82 got filled in two rounds of centralised online admission counselling conducted by Department of Higher Education (DAVV).

In percentage, the admission figure stands at 23.5 in the city. However, MEd colleges in other cities fared better than Indore. The state’s admission figure after two rounds of counselling stands at 38.5 per cent.

Out 3,300 seats in 65 MEd colleges in the state, as many as 1,273 seats got filled and 2,027 are still lying vacant.

These figures surfaced when MPOnline, a service provider of the state government, released a list of vacancies at MEd colleges across the state for the third and final round of counselling.

A closer look at the list revealed that three colleges witnessed zero admissions whereas three others saw less than five students opting for the programme.

MEd colleges in Indore held poor exam results accountable for the sorry state of admission.

“The pass percentage in MEd course stood at below 10 per cent in colleges under Devi Ahilya Vishwavidyalaya. The situation was no better in other colleges under other varsities in the state. This led to students losing interest in the course,” said a college principal on condition of not to be quoted.

The colleges also held Department of Higher Education (DHE) responsible for poor admission scenario. They stated that the DHE did not share contact details of students allocated seats in their colleges because of which allocations could not convert into admissions.

“If provided with contact details, we would have invited students to come to college and complete the formalities for admission. But that could not happen,” he said.

(To receive our E-paper on whatsapp daily, please click here. We permit sharing of the paper's PDF on WhatsApp and other social media platforms.)

Published on: Monday, September 13, 2021, 10:36 PM IST
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement