Mother and teen daughter after quarrel on sofa at home.Problems between generations concept. Teen closed his ears with his hands while her mom yells at her.Problems between generations concept. Teen closed his ears with his hands while her mom yells at her.
Mother and teen daughter after quarrel on sofa at home.Problems between generations concept. Teen closed his ears with his hands while her mom yells at her.Problems between generations concept. Teen closed his ears with his hands while her mom yells at her.

New Delhi: New research finds that some teens, especially when they feel lonely, prefer face-to-face interactions to social media. The findings are encouraging given that 80 percent of teens say they constantly feel lonely, says Rui Chen, associate professor of information systems in Iowa State University’s Ivy College of Business. The study, published in the journal Information and Management, offers a deeper understanding of why some teens use social media when they’re lonely.

The study also documents a gender split. Chen says girls tended to interact directly with friends, while boys in the study defaulted to Facebook. “More and more generations are growing up as digital natives. As teens they use technology all the time to keep in contact with their friends, to learn, and for entertainment,” Chen says. “However, when it comes to loneliness, we found the reason teens go on or offline depends on their coping strategies.” Digital natives who develop active coping strategies tackle the issue of loneliness directly and engage in more face-to-face interactions with friends, compared to those who use passive coping strategies and avoid the problem by connecting with friends on social media, according to the study. In these situations, Chen says Facebook can be destructive for teens.

“Facebook creates an illusion,” Chen says. “Teens are creating a vast network of friends online, but they don’t have a lot of deep interactions with these friends to help solve their problems. It just creates an illusion of friends.”

For the study, Chen and Elodie Gentina, lead author and associate professor at the IÉSEG School of Management in France, surveyed 409 French teens, ages 13 to 18, about feelings of loneliness, coping strategies, as well as when and how they interact with friends on social media and in person. While the study looked specifically at Facebook, Chen says the findings extend to other social media platforms. According to a 2018 Pew Research Center report, 95 percent of teens have a smartphone or access to one, and 45 percent say they are almost always online.

(To download our E-paper please click here. The publishers permit sharing of the paper's PDF on WhatsApp and other social media platforms.)

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