Brisbane: Indian shooter Heena Sidhu holds tricolour during the medal ceremony after winning gold in the Women’s 25m Pistol final event at the Commonwealth Games 2018, in Brisbane, Australia on Tuesday.  PTI Photo by Manvender Vashist 

(PTI4_10_2018_000059B)
Brisbane: Indian shooter Heena Sidhu holds tricolour during the medal ceremony after winning gold in the Women’s 25m Pistol final event at the Commonwealth Games 2018, in Brisbane, Australia on Tuesday. PTI Photo by Manvender Vashist (PTI4_10_2018_000059B)

“I am exhausted, those are my thoughts on this performance,” Sidhu quipped while speaking to PTI after her gold on Tuesday.

Brisbane : Heena Sidhu picked up India’s third gold medal in shooting at the ongoing Commonwealth Games, finishing on top in the women’s 25m pistol event and also breaking a Games record in the process.

The 28-year-old Sidhu shot a final score of 38, two of the series being perfect fives, to claim the top honours ahead of Australian Elena Galiabovitch (35).

The bronze medal went to Malaysia’s Alia Azahari (26). This was Sidhu’s second medal at the ongoing Games after having claimed a silver in the 10m air pistol event behind 16-year-old compatriot Manu Bhaker. Incidentally, this is her first major medal in the 25m pistol event with most of her other podium finishes being in 10m air pistol.

“I am exhausted, those are my thoughts on this performance,” Sidhu quipped while speaking to PTI after her gold on Tuesday. Annuraj Singh finished sixth after being eliminated in the second stage of the same event. Her final score was a disappointing 15.

Sidhu, however, was in terrific form after qualifying third with a score of 579 despite admitting to struggling with her trigger finger owing to a nerve problem.

“Thankfully, my trigger which has been giving me some trouble because of a tingling sensation was alright today. I didn’t feel that tingling too much,” Sidhu said after the medal. “The 10m air pistol final is a blur to me, I couldn’t feel my fingers during that. I have been undergoing physiotherapy for this problem but for today, I told my physio not to touch me. I just let it be and to my relief it went off well,” she said on Tuesday.

Her coach, husband and the Indian shooting team’s manager Raunak Pandit was by her side as she spoke and when asked what went into maintaining consistency at the highest level, Sidhu turned to her better half for answers.

“I guess it’s about ensuring that whether you compete at the Olympics or the state championships, the intensity and process remains the same. If an athlete can achieve that, the results will automatically come,” said Pandit.

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