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Updated on: Thursday, May 30, 2019, 01:50 PM IST

EPR rules must include guidelines for sound disposal of E-waste: Experts

A pile of electronic waste on a roadside in Guiyu. Much of modern electronic equipment contains toxic ingredients and as much as 4,000 tonnes of toxic e-waste is discarded every hour. Vast amounts are routinely and often illegally shipped as waste from Europe, USA and Japan to countries in Asia because it is easier and cheaper to dump the problem on poorer countries with lower environmental standards. Workers involved in dismantling e-waste are exposed to serious health hazards. |

A pile of electronic waste on a roadside in Guiyu. Much of modern electronic equipment contains toxic ingredients and as much as 4,000 tonnes of toxic e-waste is discarded every hour. Vast amounts are routinely and often illegally shipped as waste from Europe, USA and Japan to countries in Asia because it is easier and cheaper to dump the problem on poorer countries with lower environmental standards. Workers involved in dismantling e-waste are exposed to serious health hazards. |

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Mumbai: With the environment ministry notifying the new E-Waste Management Rules 2016, that would bring the producers under Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR), experts feel the need to infuse capital and recognise recycling as an industry. The new rules would make the manufacturer responsible to collect e-waste generated during the manufacture of any electrical and electronic equipment and also seek authorisation from State Pollution Control Boards (SPCBs).

Also Read: MCGM plans to produce power from solid waste in offing!

Satish Sinha, Associate Director, Toxics Links, said “We have been rating companies on EPR in terms of collection centres; buy back systems, awareness programmes and the results have been disappointing. Even the SPCBs do not mention E-waste rules on their website. We had no option but to move to court on this.”

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According to the experts, the new EPR rule would help the manufacture themselves take the responsibility of disposing the electronic waste. It would also help to create an organisation wherein people can come to dispose off their waste and also manage them.

“EPR would also help in reducing the cost for management of waste. At present, the waste management involves a lot of money for transporting the electronic waste and identifying the dumping sites,”added Sinha.

Also Read: Govt stresses on waste management to achieve smart cities

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Experts also say that the new EPR rule must also carry guidelines on disintegrating a particular electronic or electrical waste for its sound disposal.

Lusille Andrade, Associate Vice President, Environmental Management Centre said, “It is very important that guidelines must be included in the new EPR rules since there is a lack of recycling centres in the state.”

“There must be a proper E-waste management strategy in the state with proper resources in place to manage E-waste”, added Sinha.

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Published on: Thursday, July 28, 2016, 09:58 AM IST
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