Writer Ashok Kumar Bhattacharya speaks at a session on his book ‘The Rise of Goliath: Twelve disruptions that changed India’ on Saturday, the second day of the Bhopal Literature and Art Festival (BLF) at Bharat Bhavan.
Writer Ashok Kumar Bhattacharya speaks at a session on his book ‘The Rise of Goliath: Twelve disruptions that changed India’ on Saturday, the second day of the Bhopal Literature and Art Festival (BLF) at Bharat Bhavan.

BHOPAL: Demonetisation was an economic disaster, the ill-effects of which are still visible. It was a political move and not an economic one.

Writer Ashok Kumar Bhattacharya made the above statement at a session on his book ‘The Rise of Goliath: Twelve disruptions that changed India’ on Saturday, the second day of the Bhopal Literature and Art Festival (BLF) at Bharat Bhavan.

Bhattacharya said that unlike what is believed, DeMon was not a sudden move. “It was being planned for weeks and months,” he said. Bhattacharya said that the decision did help the then regime politically. “For at least two years, common people believed that they are suffering but the rich and the exploiters were suffering more,” he said.

He said that India had seen demonetisation twice since Independence - first time in 1978 and then in 2016 and on both the occasions, Gujaratis were occupying the posts of Prime Minister and Governor of the RBI.

22 sessions of author talk held: A total of 22 sessions of authors on various topics were held on the second day of the literature festival. Writers from across the country spoke at these sessions held in Antarang, Vaagarth and Abhirang auditoriums. Earlier, Bhopal to Bhopal Heritage Walk was organised in the morning. During this, curator Pooja Saxena informed the tourists about the history of Rani Kamalapati Palace, Kamala Park etc.

Tale of an educated Muslim woman narrated: Writer Noor Zaheer spoke about her book which is a story of an educated Muslim woman, in conversation with Kaneez Razavi. Zaheer said that the constitutions and the laws should run the society not the Maulvis, as the women are suffering from the scarcity of favourable laws and facing the norms of hideous society.

Savarkar's early life unveiled: 'Savarkar’ a Hindu fanatic or freedom fighter's story was discussed by young historian and writer Vikram Sampat and Reema Ahuja. He quoted his book 'Savarkar Echoes from a Forgotten Past' about the untouched moments of Savarkar's early life. This book captures the events of Savarkar's birth from 1883 to his departure to cellular prison in 1924.

Jahangir’s love for art and culture: Parvati Sharma discussed about her book ‘The intimate portrait of Jahangir, the Artistic Emperor’. She said that Jahangir, with a great love for art and culture, wanted to enhance it and develop it for many years. Art, literature and architecture flourished during the reign of Jahangir. In Jahangir's era, the depiction of the manuscript was less important than the imagery.

Trafficking of Indigenous Species: While discussing the 'Trafficking of Indigenous Species' a journalist Deshdeep Saxena said that today the condition of endangered animals is very bad. He said that today 24 per cent of tigers in India are killed due to smuggling. He said China to be the largest market for tiger smuggling, where traditional Chinese medicines, cosmetics, etc. are made from tiger skins and their parts.

Insist on the implementation of what you think: Writer, thinker Vineet Bajpai, the young CEO was invited to discuss 'The Winning CEO'. He said that successful people are more focused and always work harder than others. Do not back down from fear of losing or due to lack of resources; rather insist on the implementation of what you think.

Stress laid on mental illness: On a very significant topic, do marriages always succeed, Smita Singh talked to Kiran Manral, the author Missin, presumed dead. The session quoted the important issue of mental illness as many people still don’t ask for it even when they need it.

Unfolding history of Delhi: Swapna Liddle, author, Connaught Place and the making of New Delhi, unfolded some interesting facts about the creation of national capital Delhi. She was in the conversation with M M Upadhyay ad Meera Das where she revealed that a big area of Delhi was first demolished before establishing the new one.

Poetry still tells the truth: In the poetry recitation Umashankar Chaudhary, Arun Kamal, Rajendra Sharma wooed the audience with poems and introduced the current social scenario. Kamal expressed deep concern over Hindi newspapers and said that Hindi is no longer left in Hindi newspapers. They believe that newspaper people cannot tell the truth, but poetry still tells the truth.

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