Free Press Journal

5 spots in Maharashtra to avoid during Monsoon

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What better way to welcome monsoon, than visiting the lush green forts and breathtaking waterfalls, right? Though monsoon bring out the best the state has to offer but is also the time when most accidents happen. According to a report, the Raigad and Navi Mumbai police over the past few weeks have recorded 15 deaths and 50 injuries at various waterfalls and hilly areas. Today we bring to you a list of five spots in Maharashtra to avoid during monsoon.

Tungareshwar Waterfalls, Vasai
The waterfalls is at an altitude of about 2,177 feet and is a favorite spot for trekkers, mountaineers and nature lovers. The thickly wooded picnic spot had witnessed several major accidents in the past. Last year, two youngsters from Kandivali who had gone on a picnic drowned in the waterfalls.


Devkund Waterfalls, Raigad
The hidden waterfall in the forest near Bhira village is about 50 km away from Mumbai. Though the place is far from the hustle and bustle of city it is advised to avoid it this monsoon. In June 2017, a group of 55 students, between 17 and 20 years of age, were trapped here. A three hours rescue operation was carried out by a team of Mangaon Police and Kundalika Rafters to rescue them all.

Chinchoti Waterfalls, Vasai
Located amidst the lush green forest, Chinchoti waterfalls comprises of several small and big waterfalls. The place has witnesses several accidents and deaths in the past. Last year, there were around seven to eight cases of drowning leaving several people dead and injured.

Also read: 10 Monsoon treks near Mumbai for beginners

Gadeshwar Dam, Panvel
Surrounded by green hills and paddy fields, Gadeshwar Dam is located in Panvel. Though watching the dam overflow during monsoon is a sheer pleasure it is advisable to avoid swimming here. Recently, two members of a family drowned in a river near the dam.

Prabalgad Fort, Panvel
Also known as Kalavantin Durg, the fort is located between Matheran and Panvel, at an elevation of about 2,300 feet in the Western Ghats. The fort becomes a dangerous spots in monsoon with narrow peaks and steep slopes. With no rail on the edges and no ropes on the walls trekking is a challenge during monsoon. The fort is also considered as one of the most dangerous forts in the world.