Free Press Journal

A beginner’s guide to good clicks

FOLLOW US:

Are you just starting out with photography? Here are some tips to ensure that you are producing amazing photos in no time

THE RULE OF THIRDS

The key compositional tool is the rule of thirds. Look through your camera’s viewfinder or camera screen, and imagine it is divided into thirds both horizontally and vertically. Alternatively, check your camera’s manual because often, this overlay grid can be activated on the display for you. To make the most visually interesting image, place the main subjects on the intersection points of these lines.


WHITE BALANCE IS YOUR FRIEND

The white balance setting in a digital camera is related to colour temperature. A high colour temperature (measured in Kelvins) creates a blue colour cast, while a low colour temperature creates an orange or red colour cast. Your light source (natural light, fluorescent lights, tungsten lights and so on) usually determines the colour temperature. If your camera is constantly producing images that have an unsightly colour cast, adjust the white balance until you find a setting that produces the most natural-looking image based on your lighting conditions.

POST-PROCESSING

Don’t just let your shots languish on a hard drive somewhere. Part of the fun of photography is manipulating and editing images post-capture. Whether that’s a simple crop or a more drastic change, like turning a colour image into monochrome or black and white, post-processing opens up a whole world of other possibilities.

LEARN ABOUT EXPOSURE

Exposure is the measure of light that reaches the image sensor in order to capture an image. There are three main elements that determine how either a camera (in automatic modes) or a photographer (in manual modes) determines exposure — ISO, aperture and shutter speed. To read up more on exposure, click through to our article, which explains it in full.

GET RID OF SHUTTER LAG

Shutter lag is that awkward moment in time between pressing the shutter button, the camera focusing and finally getting around to taking the shot. On some cameras, such as SLRs, this lag is hardly noticeable. Some compact cameras suffer from quite pronounced shutter lag, which means that often, you are likely to miss the exact moment you want to capture, while waiting for the camera to catch up.