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Vishwaroopam 2 movie: Review, Cast, Director

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Film: Vishwaroopam 2

Cast: Kamal Hassan, Pooja Kumar, Andrea Jeremiah, Nasser, Rahul Bose, Shekhar Kapoor, Rajendra Gupta, Anant Narayan Mahadevan, Jude S Walko, Damian Mavis, Russell Geoffrey Banks

Director: Kamal Hassan


Rating: * *

A vanity extension from the first assay ‘Vishwaroopam,’ this multi-lingual film has Vishwanath a.k.a Wisam Ahmed Kashmiri (Kamal Haasan), the Bharatnatyam dancer cum undercover RAW agent, with the two women in his life – his make-believe wife, Dr Nirupama (Pooja Kumar) a nuclear oncologist from the USA and Asmita (Andrea Jeremiah), his co-conspirator and fellow RAW recruit, in tow, revisit his old foes Omar (Rahul Bose) and Salim (Jaideep Ahlawat).

Other than this brief intro nothing makes much sense in this conscripted attempt at ego inflation. The sheer egotism and narcissism exhibited in this slap-dash effort meant to give Kamal Haasan’s flagging career an intended fill-up and put to some use all the shorn off bits and pieces from the previous effort makes this experience a relentless, joyless and unforgivable experience.

The story doesn’t make much sense – other than the broad outline, the presence and importance of the two young women (several decades his junior and looking it) in the scheme of things here is never expressed plausibly and the detour into the past with his danseuse mother (Waheeda Rehman) who suffers from Alzheimer’s and is in a nursing home has no significance at all – other than to give Waheeda Rehman some moments in the sun. The performances are all rote – going through the motions without gauging effect or importance. Even a thespian like Kamal Haasan has begun to perform sluggishly. In fact, none of the actors make a commendable impact here.

The story/screenplay credited to Kamal Haasan is totally disjointed, and sorely lacking in cohesion and plausibility. Everything that happens in the film appears like an after-thought, completely contrived and thus indigestible. Atul Tiwari’s Hindi dialogues strain credibility and the unnecessary addition of dull, uninspiring songs and music by Mohammad Ghibran sinks the overall effect into a sinkhole that pulls all the effort into deeper insignificance.

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