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Tum Bin 2: Continuing love saga without the story

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Film: Tum Bin 2

Cast: Aditya Seal, Aashim Gulati, Neha Sharma, Kanwaljit Singh

Director: Anubhav Sinha


The original, a 2001 movie helmed by Anubhav Sinha starring Priyanshu Chatterjee, Sandali Sinha, Himanshu Malik, and Raqesh Vashisth, a convoluted love quadrangle, was considered a sleeper hit at the box office. The songs were memorable but I have my doubts about how much money it made.

Also Read : Want to revive romantic genre in Bollywood: Tum Bin director Anubhav Sinha

Never mind that, this sequel effort is nothing but a brand extension.

The conundrum that encapsulated Pia, Shekhar, Abhi and Amar’s intersecting experiences has nothing to do with this film. There’s really no story continuity from the first to hope for—other than Sandali Sinha’s attempt to console Taran (Neha Sharma) following the loss of her fiancé. She is understandably depressed and the setting is mellow, the mood melancholic. Sob…Sob…she goes almost flooding the plush bedroom.

It turns out that Taran and Amar (Aashim Gulati), the ideal ‘in love’ couple were on a vacation which ended in tragedy. Even after 10 days, Amar’s body was never found. Taran, pitiful in mourning is now being cheered up by her family. Her fiancé’s father (Kanwaljit) introduces her to Shekhar (Aditya Seal) and the two begin to hit it off well. But just when Taran begins to develop feelings for Shekhar, Amar returns, claiming he was in a coma for 8 months and was miraculously cured.

Read More : ‘Tum Bin 2’ not a sequel: Anubhav Sinha

Chalo, we’ll buy even that. But what we won’t accept is a rehash of the ‘Tum Bin’ story all over again. Really? Was there no other story to tell? Even characters names, the crucial ones in fact, are the same. So much for creativity. Is this how a film becomes a sequel, you may well ask?

The songs are hummable at least, the cinematography is a lure but the melodramatic treatment and the overwhelming background score makes the experience quite a tedious one. Performances go over-the-top to stage-manage affect.

Romantic moments are predicative and the obvious attempts to tug at your tear ducts only make it all seem manipulative. And the run time is so long that you might well go into a coma yourself. That’s not something anyone in their right minds would love or enjoy.