Free Press Journal

Wedding Anniversary: Immature Romantic Philosophy

FOLLOW US:

Film: Wedding Anniversary

Cast: Mahie Gill, Nana Patekar, Priyanshu Chatterjee, Yatin Karyekar, Shruti Marathe

Director: Shekhar S Jha


She says her name is Kahaani (Mahie Gill) and even claims to be gorgeous. The poor man who is supposed to be baking a cake for her first wedding anniversary is expected to come up with a confection to suit her beauty. That’s a tall order if you ask me. Not because she is so damn gorgeous but because she is so full of herself that she is insufferable.

Kahaani and Nirbhay have decided to meet up again in Goa to celebrate their coming together in the same place last year. Nirbhay is unfortunately caught up with work and is taking a late flight to Goa which will reach him to the appointed venue at around 12 midnight. Kahaani is not amused and tells him to go fish. She has just finished cooking Nirbhay (Priyanshu’s) favourite dish and has been making all the arrangements to make their anniversary a special one.

So she flops onto the bed in acute disappointment and goes back to reading her Book titled ‘Pratibimb.’ The next thing we know—in walks a stranger Nagarjun (Nana Patekar) into her home. He talks in riddles that she can least understand. They quibble for a bit and then go out to town and along the route encounter different couples with unique relationship problems. Our dimwit Kahaani takes a long time realizing that it’s her own story playing out in different facets. Needless to say when the clock strikes twelve, her husband gets home and she wakes up from what seemed like a never-ending nightmare for the audience.

The narrative is heavy on romantic philosophy of the verbal kind and that’s just not tenable in a movie that has nothing else of import to offer. The direction is amateurish – there’s no room for nuance here. The performances come across as fake – don’t know what Nana Patekar was doing here.

This film really has nothing to keep you interested – not the item song, not the innumerable costume changes that Mahie Gill undergoes, not the uninteresting monologues that Nana Patekar spouts at the drop of a penny and not the ridiculous party sequence where a frustrated married woman picks up a young buck for a night of sex. It’s all so stupidly and annoyingly orchestrated that you’d want to just walk out of the theatre in acute disappointment!