Free Press Journal

Movie Review: Bezubaan Ishq – Antiquated TV style romance!

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Bezubaan Ishq

Cast: Mugda Godse , Sneha Ullal, Farida Zalal, Nishant Malkani,

Director: Jashwant Gangani

Rating: * ½


They claim it to be a modern romance with a traditional Indian backdrop and values but what it amounts to is  a bad incompatible marriage of ideas altogether.

Mansukh Patel(   an NRI businessman , his British wife and  daughter Rhum Jhum(Sneha Ullal) have come down for the engagement and marriage of his brother Rashmikant’s daughter Suhani( Mugda Godse)’s engagement and marriage to Swaagat(Nishant Malkani) who adores and cares for her as a friend. Soon after the engagement , the couple , Rhum Jhum and a gaggle of friends are sent off to enjoy a holiday at Lovenest hotel in Jaipur. Suhani , who suffers from a weird , rare and incurable condition called  ‘Intermittent Explosive Disorder’ has quite convenient bouts of explosive anger and binging on beer as part of her symptoms. Obviously she can’t help herself and therefore garners sympathy from those around her- most notably Swaagat, who suddenly finds himself falling for Suhani’s more traditional Londoner cousin. Once they are back in the home city things take a turn for the worse just when marriage preparations are on in full swing.

Sacrifice appears to be the main theme here with both girls trying their hand at it  while Swaagat is made to wait out the ini-mini-myna-mo shake-up in order to find out who is going to be his life partner at the end.

It’s a totally stupid take and allows for no one character to be either assertive or decisive. Illness is shown as an acceptable tool for emotional blackmail while the contrariness of the characters doesn’t sit well within the narrative. While the intention to show Suhani’s illness as the propelling factor towards the eventual outcome may seem an acceptable one, it beats all logic and leaves you rather distended at the end of it all.  The obsession with pink and obvious color-coding is a little too overpowering. Nishant Malkani doesn’t seem to have outgrown his TV habit of giving one note beatific expressions, Sneha Ullal looks discontended as usual while Mugda Godse fritters away the advantage of a decent author-backed role with her atrocious diction and accent. Yet, she is still the only saving grace here – mainly because she manages to look great throughout.Director Jashwant Gangani also appears to be stuck in TV mode for his ‘takes’  which appear flat and uninteresting. This narrative is entirely forgettable!

Johnson Thomas