Free Press Journal

Digvijay gets RS nomination

FOLLOW US:

To break 10- yr vow with backdoor entry into Parliament; to file RS nominations today

BHOPAL:AICC general secretary Digvijay Singh is all set to make a backdoor entry into Parliament through the Rajya Sabha, ten years after he vowed not to contest any election or hold any official post. Congress on Monday nominated the former Chief Minister of Madhya Pradesh as its candidate from one of the three vacant seats from Madhya Pradesh, which the Congress is in a position to win.

Digvijay had been repeatedly saying that he would not make a backdoor entry into Parliament and that he was ready to contest Lok Sabha polls.His candidature was announced from Delhi on Monday night.


In 2003, Digvijay Singh had announced not to contest any poll for ten years, taking responsibility for party’s embarrassing drubbing in the Vidhan Sabha polls held that year. Since then his party did not return to power but he recently announced to contest Lok Sabha polls. He had reportedly even short- listed Sagar, Indore and Rajgarh seats.

He would file nomination with Congress MLAs in Vidhan Sabha on the last day on Tuesday at 11 am. Party sources said, his brother Laxman Singh may now contest Lok Sabha poll from Rajgarh parliamentary seat.

I kept my word for 10 years: Digvijay

Digvijaya Singh, who reached here by an evening flight from Delhi, said that when the party asked his choice, he chose RS. ” The party decided that I will work in the organisation and give me seat in the Upper House,” said Singh. Talking with media persons, the former chief minister said he was willing to contest Lok Sabha poll and has urged the party to find out a seat for him but the party high command took the decision to send me to Rajya Sabha which he accepted. Singh also said he too would contest Lok Sabha poll if the party asks him to. When asked how he was feeling at the end of his ten- year vow, he said ” It is said that political leaders do not keep their words but I kept my words and did not contest any elections in last ten years.’